Science bouncing balls coursework

Super Ball became a fad when it was introduced. [11] Peak production reached over 170,000 Super Balls per day. [12] By December 1965, over six million had been sold, and . Presidential adviser McGeorge Bundy had five dozen shipped to the White House for the amusement of the staff. [1] [12] [13] [14] Wham-O Executive Vice-president Richard P. Knerr knew that fads are short-lived. "Each Super Ball bounce is 92% as high as the last," he once said. "If our sales don't come down any faster than that, we've got it made." [14] Initially, the full-sized Super Ball sold for 98¢ at retail; by the end of 1966, its colorful miniature versions sold for as little as 10¢ in vending machines. [15]

BB gun shots to the forehead and groin? A steaming hot iron and can of paint to the face? A flaming blowtorch to the scalp? The Wet Bandits endure an awful lot of violence at the hands of a single eight-year-old. So much so that neither one of them should have been walking—let alone conscious—by the end of the night. In 2012, Dr. Ryan St. Clair diagnosed the likely outcome of their injuries at The Week . While a read-through of the entire article is well worth your time, here are a few of the highlights: That iron should have caused a “blowout fracture,” leading to “serious disfigurement and debilitating double vision if not repaired properly.” And the blowtorch? According to Dr. St. Clair, “The skin and bone tissue on Harry's skull will be so damaged and rotted that his skull bone is essentially dying and will likely require a transplant.” 

Certain types of sport balls are composed of materials that have elasticity, or the ability to quickly and easily revert back to their original shape after being stretched or deformed. Rubber, for example, is a type of material that is very elastic. When a rubber ball is dropped and hits the ground, the bottom of the rubber ball will become slightly deformed. Since this isn’t the original form of the rubber ball, it will quickly revert back to its original shape, a round sphere. The pressure of the ball snapping back into a round sphere will push against the ground, causing the ball to bounce back up.

That is a good physics question! Yes, gravity does affect they way balls bounce. Gravity pulls the ball toward the ground, slowing the ball down so that each bounce is shorter and shorter, until eventually the ball stops bouncing. The force of the ball hitting the hard ground puts an equal force back onto the ball, causing it to bounce up. This happens because balls are made out of an elastic material like rubber, which means they can be dented or stretched and then return to their normal shape (think of what happens when you squeeze a balloon). If the ball was made of something softer like silly putty, it would just be squashed on the ground and wouldn't bounce. If the ball was made of something harder like glass, it would hit the ground and break.

Science bouncing balls coursework

science bouncing balls coursework

That is a good physics question! Yes, gravity does affect they way balls bounce. Gravity pulls the ball toward the ground, slowing the ball down so that each bounce is shorter and shorter, until eventually the ball stops bouncing. The force of the ball hitting the hard ground puts an equal force back onto the ball, causing it to bounce up. This happens because balls are made out of an elastic material like rubber, which means they can be dented or stretched and then return to their normal shape (think of what happens when you squeeze a balloon). If the ball was made of something softer like silly putty, it would just be squashed on the ground and wouldn't bounce. If the ball was made of something harder like glass, it would hit the ground and break.

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